U.s.-Taliban Peace Agreement


Afghan peace talks: the woman who negotiated with the Taliban Given the progress made so far, the talks are expected to take time and their outcome is uncertain. But after years of conflict that have done no more than a dead end on the battlefield, they represent at least a chance for peace for Afghans. U.S. allies and coalition partners, as well as the U.S. Security Council and regional parties to the conflict, have expressed support for the U.S.-Taliban agreement and the U.S.-Afghanistan joint statement. However, these recent peace efforts in Afghanistan will be difficult to implement, given the uncertainty surrounding the U.S. timetable for troop withdrawal and the lifting of sanctions against the Taliban, concerns about the future of counterterrorism operations under these agreements, and the apparent resurgence of the Taliban last year. The Taliban may also struggle to convince Quetta Shura skeptics – the Taliban council or Rahbari Shura – such as Abdul Qayyum Zakir, Mullah Ibrahim Sadar, Mullah Yaqub and even leader Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada. Junior Taliban commanders or partner groups such as al-Qaeda could also oppose a deal or oppose how an agreement is implemented. According to the United Nations, al-Qaeda leaders have conducted shuttle diplomacy to influence Taliban leaders and field commanders, oppose peace negotiations — and even promise to increase al-Qaeda`s financial support for the Taliban.

Since the agreement between the United States and the Taliban, violence has even intensified in Afghanistan. Some Taliban fighters have insisted that they continue their jihad “until an Islamic system is established,” prompting concerns that the organization is not really committed to peace. Groups like the Islamic State of Khorasan could oppose the negotiations and try to attract disgruntled Taliban. The insurrection is not a homogeneous organization. These include other insurgent groups, drug trafficking organizations, tribes and militias, some of which may strongly oppose a peace agreement. Even successful peace agreements have been threatened by cheerleaders who refuse to participate and instead remain committed to violence to achieve their goals, such as the Real Irish Republican Army in Northern Ireland and the National Liberation Army in Colombia. Both carried out attacks before, during and after the peace agreements. The agreement between the United States and the Taliban and the Afghan government`s joint statement do not contain any provisions that leave room for civil society organizations to meaningfully participate in discussions about the future of the country. . . .